KCSO & Suquamish Police Interlocal Agreement

Law enforcement partners Suquamish Police and Kitsap County Sheriff.

Kitsap County Sheriff Gary Simpson and Suquamish Police Chief Mike Lasnier are pleased to announce that Kitsap County and the Suquamish Tribe have entered into an agreement to provide better and more efficient police services on the Port Madison Reservation. Effective July 1, 2017, Suquamish Police Officers will have state authority to:

  •  issue state citations to non-Indians for state traffic violations on the reservation.
  • pursue non-tribal traffic law violators and fleeing suspects past reservation boundaries.
  • under certain circumstances, arrest non-Indians for state crimes committed on the reservation.

The agreement is part of a new Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Suquamish Tribe and Kitsap County, and fulfills the conditions of a Washington State statute that, upon request, requires county governments to enter into agreements with tribes when they share jurisdiction on an Indian reservation (RCW 10.92). The KCSO and SPD have worked together to provide law enforcement services on the Port Madison reservation for many years. However, depending on the type of land ownership and the Indian status of individuals, the rules for jurisdiction changed for each agency.

KCSO Lt. Jeffrey Menge pointed out that prior to the MOU a tribal officer had (and still has) the right to detain any person suspected of a crime and could investigate any crime on the reservation but they could not make any formal arrests or transports under state law. This will now change. An example of this new collaboration can be illustrated with a common DUI Investigation. In the past, a tribal officer had the ability to stop and detain a person suspected of DUI on the reservation but once they determined the suspect was “non-Indian”, the officer was required to stop and wait for a KCSO Deputy or State Trooper to respond and finish the investigation. Under the MOU, the Suquamish officer can now complete the entire investigation under state authority, including arrest and transport to the jail, thus eliminating the need to tie up other officers and duplicate efforts.

The Suquamish Police Department includes a Marine Division, that also coordinates with Kitsap County Sheriff Deputies.

“It doesn’t take two cops to do the work of one cop. Tribal officers and citizens have been stuck on the side of the road awaiting the arrival of a Deputy, who in many cases was pulled away from a more serious investigation to come handle a minor offense. It gets worse; two officers now have to write reports, receive subpoenas and will have to go to court at substantial cost to two different governments. These are low level cases; traffic violations and misdemeanor property crimes. We want our deputies out there catching burglars and heroin dealers, not driving 20 minutes to write a suspended driver a citation we could have issued in 90 seconds,” said Suquamish Police Chief Mike Lasnier.

Sheriff Gary Simpson credits a good working relationship between Kitsap County and the Suquamish Tribe for making the MOU a reality. “Our already collaborative and cooperative working relationship made this process as easy as it could have been, given its complexity.” Simpson said, “In many ways, this agreement memorializes an already fantastic working relationship.”
Sheriff Simpson added that the end result of the complex process is “a more effective and efficient public safety response for all citizens on the Port Madison Reservation and surrounding communities.”

Kitsap County Sherriff will be hosting an open house for those who want to know more at 5:30 p.m. on June 22, 2017 at the Suquamish United Church of Christ, 18732 Division Ave. NE, Suquamish, WA 98392.  For more information on the interlocal agreement, check out our Suquamish Police Frequently Asked Questions Page or download a printable brochure by clicking here.

Schooner Adventuress visits Suquamish – Free Public Dockside Tours April 17

The Adventuress will be moored at the Suquamish Dock April 17-18, 2016.

Adventuress – Puget Sound’s official Environmental Tall Ship – to visit Suquamish on Monday, April 17 during Earth Month. The historic ship is one of only two National Historic Landmark (NHL) sailing ships still in active operation on the West Coast. Special thanks to the Suquamish Tribe for making available the use of the public dock.

Adventuress will be open for FREE Dockside Tours:

Monday, April 17 from 3:00-5:00PM

Visitors can climb aboard the ship and learn about its century-old history with a maiden voyage to the Arctic for the American Museum of Natural History, service for decades with the San Francisco Bar Pilots, and role as an on-the-water education platform for Puget Sound youth since 1963.

Adventuress is owned and operated by the nonprofit Sound Experience with a mission to educate, inspire, and empower an inclusive community that works to improve our marine environment and celebrates our maritime heritage. On occasion, the organization partners with Suquamish youth program staff to develop meaningful programs for young people involving both tribal canoes and Adventuress.

Adventuress sails “not for one but for all” with the core belief that We are ALL shipmates.

For more information, visit www.soundexp.org

Suquamish Foundation’s Time To Gather Raises 50K

A silent auction table at the Time to Gather event, held on Friday, March 24 at Kiana Lodge.

The Suquamish Foundation held its annual “A Time to Gather” fundraising event Friday, March 24, at Kiana Lodge. The sold-out crowd of enthusiastic bidders helped the Foundation reach its $50,000 fundraising goal, the proceeds targeted for a planned playground, the Suquamish Museum, and benefiting programs from the broader community.
Guests were welcomed by Tribal Chairman Leonard Forsman and Foundation Manager, Angela Flemming who presented a brief history of the event, its purpose and importance to the Suquamish Tribe. Happy attendees enjoyed a delicious meal of either cedar-wrapped salmon, apricot chicken or braised eggplant, all prepared by the experienced staff at Kiana Lodge.
Standout live auction items included a traditional medicinal herbs gathering excursion with Noel Purser-Rosario, a Port Madison Indian Reservation tour led by Tribal Chairman, Leonard Forsman, two limited edition serigraphs by Preston Singletary, a 3 day-2 night Alaska Fishing Adventure, and an original brush and ink painting of the Traveling Coyote by Emma Noyes. Bidding was spirited and exceeded the valued price for the benefit of the Suquamish Foundation.

Suquamish Tribe General Council 2017 Election

In addition to being reelected at Suquamish Tribal Chairman, Leonard Forsman was also honored as a new member of the Suquamish Elders- a designation given to Tribal Members when they turn 55 years-old.

The Suquamish Tribe annual General Council meeting was held March 18-19, 2017 at Kiana Lodge. In addition to hearing reports from departments throughout government and business operations, Suquamish Tribal Members also had the opportunity to vote for Chairman and Secretary of the Suquamish Tribal Council. A total of 355 Tribal Members voted in the election.

Two people ran for the Chairmanship, incumbent Leonard Forsman and Wayne George. Forsman won re-election with 68 percent of the vote. There were four candidates nominated for Secretary. Nigel Lawrence was re-elected to the position with 120 votes. Matt Hawk Sr. ran and received 113 votes. Votes and remaining candidates were Randy George (78) and Linda Holt (45).

Forsman has served as Chairman of the Suquamish Tribe since 2005. In addition to his position on council, he is also the Vice-Chairman of the national Advisory Council on Historic Preservation. He is a graduate of the University of Washington and holds a master of arts in historic preservation from Goucher College.

This is the third time Lawrence has been elected to the Suquamish Tribal Council, and his second consecutive term. In addition to his position on council, Lawrence is the Director of the Marion Forsman-Boushie Early Learning Center and a graduate of Eastern Michigan University.

The council consists of four officers; Chairman, Vice-Chairman, Treasurer, Secretary; and three at-large Council members. The Chairman only votes in case of a tie. Tribal Council officers and members serve three-year staggered terms. The Tribal Council meets on alternate Mondays and as needed throughout the year. For more information, visit the Government section of our website.

Lawrence To Perform at Time to Gather

Suquamish vocalist Calina Lawrence to be featured performer at Suquamish Foundation’s popular spring event.

Vocal artist and activist Calina Lawrence (Suquamish).

Vocal artist and activist Calina Lawrence will be performing at the annual Time to Gather event this year. A member of the Suquamish Tribe, Calina Lawrence was born and raised within her Indigenous culture in the Northwest area of Washington State. Her vocal journey began at a young age when she was first introduced to her cultural music. Lending her voice to the preservation of Suquamish traditions, she also grew to love singing many modern genres. She was raised knowing the importance of spreading awareness about the social injustices that have impacted the quality of lives on tribal reservations and within urban Native communities. Her involvement in her cultural music has led her in activism in the cities of Seattle, San Francisco, and Oakland. Lawrence recently graduated with Honors from the University of San Francisco, attaining her BA in Performing Arts & Social Justice; a Music concentration. She has spent recent time traveling the country in advocacy for Native Treaty Rights and the “Mni Wiconi” (Water is Life) movement lead by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. She dedicates her artistry and energy to POC racial injustice, police brutality, mass-incarceration, gentrification, misrepresentation of Native Americans in education/mainstream United States media, climate injustice, blood quantum and enrollment issues, foster youth, suicide prevention, and many other causes. Since graduation, she has released her debut Single entitled “Alcatraz” January ‘17 and will be releasing her first album later in the year.

A Time to Gather is an annual fundraiser that includes live performances, dinner and an art auction with proceeds benefiting the Suquamish Foundation. This year, the event will be held at Kiana Lodge on Friday, March 24, 2017. Tickets for the event are available online for a limited time.

Suquamish Foundation Announces A Time to Gather

The New Year is here. What does it hold for us? Times may feel uncertain.  And yet, one thing is absolutely certain; for those who treasure the sacred, priceless beauty of the cultural, historic and environmental values of the Puget Sound, it will be a year of true celebration and accomplishment.  It is truly a year to honor that, to share that, and, yes, to thoroughly enjoy that at a party!  Let us joyfully celebrate together at the Suquamish Foundation’s 2017 “A Time To Gather” community event on March 24th.  This will once again be held at Kiana Lodge, one of the most beautiful seaside venues in Washington State.

It has now been 12 years, since the Suquamish Tribe chartered its’ non-profit organization, the Suquamish Foundation.  The Foundation invited a wealth of enthusiastic partners and supporters to raise $20 million dollars to launch an incredibly successful “Building for Cultural Resurgence Capital Campaign “. Together we realized a vision for a renovated downtown Suquamish with a beautiful new Museum, Community House,  Community Dock, new Early Learning Center and a brighter  future.

This work goes on!  It is exciting to see such positive change in a few short years, to recognize the generosity of so many contributors and come together to support and celebrate our on-going work and mutual benefits.  The Suquamish Foundation will now focus on a new Community Playground, a vigorous fight against drug and alcohol addiction, and enhancing the cultural collections at the Suquamish Museum.

At A Time To Gather, March 24th from 6 to 9 p.m., we will be providing dinner and cocktails, an amazing cultural performance and a brilliant art auction of original pieces as well as auctioning unique cultural experiences such as a voyage in one of the Tribal canoes.  Please join us for this vibrant event and revel in our successes and support our brighter future.  We will wrap you in a metaphorical blanket of honor, love and solidarity. To purchase tickets, click here! To see photos from last year’s event, click here.

Ribbons of Resilience

Suquamish Foundation thanks community for support, pledges to host another fashion showcase next year.

Suquamish Tribal Council Member Sammy Mabe was one of several elected officials to showcase ribbon apparel at the event.

by Angela Flemming

We want to thank all of you who joined us for the Suquamish Foundation’s inaugural Ribbons of Resilience fashion show at the Whitehorse Golf Course Ballroom on October 21st. This fun evening event celebrated Tribal history and traditions as well as the individual creativity and artistry of our community members. At the same time, it raised donations for and awareness of the Suquamish Foundation, which has supported programs and projects that benefit the Suquamish community since its’ inception in 2005.
An illuminated catwalk and a live deejay’s music mix featured the stylish modeling of male and female community members of all ages, as well as the full complement of the Suquamish Tribal Council, including Chairman, Leonard Forsman, and many of the very youngest and most adorable members of the Suquamish Tribe. Robin Sigo, Treasurer of the Suquamish Tribal Council and Director of the Suquamish Foundation, the non-profit branch of the Suquamish Tribal Government, emceed the event with obvious enjoyment, story-telling, infectious humor and pride. Each of the beautiful and original ribbon shirts, garments and baby outfits told an individual story through its colors, patterns and ribbons. Each, indeed, were wearable art pieces.
Ribbons for Resilience showcased beautiful ribbon shirt and dresses from many community members and families, including original multi-piece collections by E’thayta’ ae (LynDee Wells) and Xoputsee (Alaina Capoeman). Styles included traditional stars and salmon motifs, as well as contemporary Seahawks and Star Wars designs. One of the most hauntingly beautiful garments was a ledger art shirt, worn by Chairman Forsman, with an illustrated tribute to upholding sovereignty rights guaranteed in the treaty.
Our nearly 150-person audience engaged with the energy of the models and artistry of the garments with such enthusiasm and charitable generosity that we have already started planning for next year’s event. The Ribbons of Resilience event was joyful and beautiful. Again, we thank you for your attendance and for collaborating with us in continuing to support a diverse and cohesive community working together for positive change.

To see additional photos, please visit our online gallery at www.flickr.com/suquamish  To donate or to order a # Sovereign Style shirt, please call Margeaux Lewis at (360) 394-8453.

Ocean to Table Video!