New Vendor Friendly Area to Replace Aging Building Along Suquamish Waterfront

The building, often referred to as the “Barnacle Building” will be demolished in late January, 2018.

Demolition of the waterfront building located at 18408 Angeline Avenue in Downtown Suquamish will begin later this month. Work to raze the aging structure, formerly home to Scratch Kitchen and Bella Luna restaurants, is scheduled to start on January 22, 2018 and is expected to take a week to complete. Port Madison Enterprises (PME) owns the property, and made the tough decision to remove the building after an assessment last year.

The side of the building faces a steep cliff on the waterfront in Downtown Suquamish. Though the building will be torn down, PME is taking steps to ensure the unique tree near the entrance remains on the property.

“The building’s location on the cliff, its’ age and condition were all factors in the decision. We just aren’t able to salvage the structure,” said PME Board of Directors Member Windy Anderson.

After demolition, PME plans to create a covered, open space area on the property to be used for multiple vendors, including those selling food items.

“Hopefully we will be able to utilize the space to provide the community with multiple food choices by late summer,” added Anderson.

Though the building is slated for demolition, the Suquamish Tribe Archaeology and Historic Preservation Program has been tasked with ensuring the history of the property is recorded. During the last 50 years, it’s been a restaurant, a coffee cantina, a head shop, an art studio, an apartment complex and a private residence. Property records indicate the building was constructed in 1948 and originally used as a hotel for travelers. However, there is some debate about whether the building was built on the property, or ferried over by barge from Seattle, WA.

An aerial photograph of the Suquamish Waterfront cir. 1930, detailing the location of the old Suquamish Ferry Dock and Ticket Booth, shows the undeveloped property where the building would later be located. Courtesy of the Suquamish Museum archives.

A photo of the Downtown Suquamish waterfront estimated to be taken in the 1950s’, where the building can be viewed next to the old Suquamish Ferry Dock.

“Unfortunately, this is an era where we don’t have a lot of information in our archives for those properties. During the early decades of the 1900s the federal government aggressively implemented assimilation policies, including land allotment policies that allowed reservation property to be sold out of Tribal member ownership.  BIA Agents used discriminatory regulations that declared Tribal Members non-competent giving them the access to sell lands, mostly large waterfront parcels like downtown Suquamish,” said Traditional Heritage Specialist Marilyn Jones.

An old advertisement that appeared in the Seattle Star, offering cheap land on the Port Madison Indian Reservation. For more information on the Allotment & Assimilation Era click here. For more information on the early 20th century history of the town of Suquamish click here.

Jones is seeking additional information about the building from the community and encourages the public to submit any photos or stories about the property to her office by contacting her at mjones@suquamish.nsn.us

PME’s purchase of the property, and several others in the downtown Suquamish area over the last decade, is part of the Suquamish Tribe’s “Buy Back the Reservation” initiative. With help from a combination of funds, including profits from Tribally-owned businesses, the Suquamish Tribe has been able to purchase individual properties back from private owners.

In 2015, the Reservation Buy Back Initiative reached a new milestone when the Tribe negotiated the purchase of a 220-acre parcel of land at the headwaters of Cowling Creek. The acquisition, coupled with properties owned by the Tribal Government and those owned by individual Tribal members, meant that the Suquamish owned more than half the properties within reservation boundaries for the first time in more than half a century. The Suquamish Tribal Government continues to make the initiative a priority and sets aside funds for purchases when available each year.

Suquamish Tribe Responds to DOJ’s Memorandum Regarding Marijuana Enforcement

SUQUAMISH, WA, January 4, 2018- The Suquamish Tribe has enjoyed a productive working relationship with the State of Washington and the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) in our efforts to address the unique challenges faced by Indian Tribes in states that have legalized marijuana for medical, recreational or agricultural uses. After Washington State legalized recreational marijuana, the Suquamish Tribe was forced to address the issue of marijuana regulation in its Indian Country. The tribal-state system we use today was developed over years of cooperative government-to-government work with DOJ, state initiative and legislation, carefully negotiated State-Tribal Compacts and six DOJ guidance memoranda. Despite the existence of this effective and well regulated system, DOJ today elected to rescind all six guidance memoranda without consultation.

“State and Tribal laws were created and crafted in response to the challenges marijuana presented to our communities. We agree with Governor Inslee that the Washington State system addresses these problems in a manner that is well regulated, keeps out criminals, protects it from falling into the hands of children, cracks down on driving under the influence, and carefully tracks production to prevent cross-border transfer,” said Suquamish Tribal Chairman Leonard Forsman.  “The Suquamish Tribe will continue to work closely with Washington State to best protect our people far into the future,” added Forsman.

“This is not only about the marijuana industry, it is about sovereignty, voters rights and access to safe marijuana that since becoming legal has resulted in the creation of good paying jobs and much-needed Tribal tax revenue that allows us to buy our lands back and invest in community development,” said Suquamish Tribal Treasurer Robin Sigo.

About Suquamish Tribe
Suquamish is a federally recognized sovereign Tribe. The village of Suquamish and seat of the Suquamish Tribal Government are located on the Port Madison Indian Reservation, along the shores of the Puget Sound near Seattle, WA. The Suquamish Tribe provides comprehensive government, economic and social programs to approximately 1,100 tribal members. In the last two decades, the Suquamish Tribe has become a key economic partner in the region, operating several Port Madison Enterprises business ventures, a growing seafood company and performing property management duties for lease land on the reservation.

 

Suquamish Tribe Chairman Elected ATNI President

Suquamish Chairman and newly-elected Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) President Leonard Forsman addressing attendees at the ATNI Annual Fall Convention in Spokane, WA. Photo by Robin Sigo

SUQUAMISH, WA- The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) Executive Board has a new president. Suquamish Tribal Chairman Leonard Forsman was elected to the position in a close race against fellow ATNI member and Confederated Tribes of the Colville Chairman Mike Marchand.
“I am honored and humbled to be elected ATNI President. ATNI has a legendary reputation as an intertribal organization that is committed to preserving culture, language, fishing and wildlife habitat, and healthy tribal communities. I look forward to leading our organization in continuing to fulfill its mission to advocate for the tribal rights reserved through treaties, executive orders and other agreements. The Tribes of the Northwest are committed to protecting their homelands and their ancient way of life and I will work hard to help accomplish this sacred duty,” said Forsman.
Forsman was elected September 20, 2017 during the ATNI Fall Annual Convention at The Davenport Grand in Spokane, WA. He replaces President of the Quinault Indian Nation Fawn Sharp, who held the position for 2 terms and did not seek re-election.
“The current climate in Washington D.C. requires us to remain vigilant in our efforts to protect our sovereignty, hunting and fishing rights, health care, education, veterans, sacred places and natural resources from budget cuts and policies and regulatory changes that violate the trust responsibility. We must also work with our allies to protect our housing and economic development programs and initiatives,” added Forsman.
Forsman, a 20-year Tribal Government veteran, is a well-known consensus builder in Indian Country, serving as the Co-chair for the Tribal Leaders Congress on Education, Vice President of the Washington Indian Gaming Association and Vice President of the Federal Advisory Council on Historic Preservation along with several other intergovernmental committees and organizations.
“Leonard is a dear friend and champion not only for the Suquamish Tribe, but for all of Indian Country. I know that he will serve all the Northwest Tribes and will represent our interests across the country. I am grateful for his leadership and look forward to working with him as ATNI President,” said National Congress of American Indian (NCAI) President and Swinomish Tribal Chairman Brian Cladoosby.
The ANTI Executive Board is made up of 7 positions, with elected officers serving staggered 3-year terms. In addition to Forsman, ATNI Member Tribes also re-elected Theresa Sheldon of Tulalip as 2nd Vice President and Taylor Aalvik of Cowlitz as Assistant Secretary this year.
About Leonard Forsman
Leonard Forsman is Chairman of the Suquamish Tribe, a position he has held since 2005. Previously, he was a research archaeologist for Larson Anthropological/Archaeological Services in Seattle, Washington from 1992 to 2003. From 1984 to 1990, he was Director of the Suquamish Museum in Suquamish, WA, and has served on the Museum Board of Directors since 2010. His experience and expertise earned him a federal appointment to the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, of which he is now vice-chair, where he assists in promoting the preservation, enhancement and productive use of the nation’s historic resources. In addition, Forsman has held the position of Vice President at the Washington Indian Gaming Association since 2005. He has also been a member of the Washington State Historical Society Board since 2007, the Suquamish Tribal Cultural Cooperative Committee since 2006, and the Tribal Leaders Congress on Education since 2005. Forsman received a B.A. in Anthropology from the University of Washington and an M.A. in Historic Preservation from Goucher College.
About ATNI
Formed in 1953, ATNI represents 57 Northwest tribal governments in from Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Northern California, Southeast Alaska and Western Montana. The organization provides a forum for sharing information on matters of interest to its member Tribes allowing them to develop consensus on matters of mutual importance, and assists member Tribes in their governmental and programmatic development consistent with the goals of self-determination and self-sufficiency, and provides for effective public relations and education programs with non-Indian communities. Through its conferences, forums, networks and alliances, it is the intent of ATNI to represent and advocate for the interests of its member Tribes to national Indian and non-Indian organizations and governments. For more information about ATNI or to obtain an agenda of events, visit them online at www.atnitribes.org

New Suquamish Museum Exhibit- We Are The Ancestors

On September 16, 2017 the Suquamish Museum will unveil their newest exhibit We Are The Ancestors – Photography: Through the Eyes of Suquamish. The exhibit features photographs taken by Suquamish Tribal Members of contemporary life on the Port Madison Indian Reservation.

Suquamish Museum Curator, Lydia Sigo (Suquamish), and community curator, Heather Purser (Suquamish), invited Suquamish Tribal members to submit photographs for the exhibit, giving them the opportunity to tell their own stories through images. Originally proposed by Purser, the exhibit was additionally appealing Sigo as a way to continue adding images to the extensive photograph collection documenting contemporary Suquamish families begun with the Museum’s founding Oral History program in the 1970s.

The photographs will be displayed in the Museum’s smaller gallery through March 11, 2018.  The Museum is open to the public daily from 10 am to 5 pm (excluding Holidays).  Visit the Suquamish Museum online for more information or contact them at (360) 394-8499 or @SuquamishMuseum on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

About the Suquamish Museum
The Suquamish Tribal Council chartered the Suquamish Museum in 1993 to collect preserve, study, exhibit and teach the living culture and history of the Suquamish Tribe and its Salish neighbors.  Located in the heart of Suquamish Village, the permanent exhibit Ancient Shores ~ Changing Tides chronicles the Tribe’s presence since time immemorial.

KCSO & Suquamish Police Interlocal Agreement

Law enforcement partners Suquamish Police and Kitsap County Sheriff.

Kitsap County Sheriff Gary Simpson and Suquamish Police Chief Mike Lasnier are pleased to announce that Kitsap County and the Suquamish Tribe have entered into an agreement to provide better and more efficient police services on the Port Madison Reservation. Effective July 1, 2017, Suquamish Police Officers will have state authority to:

  •  issue state citations to non-Indians for state traffic violations on the reservation.
  • pursue non-tribal traffic law violators and fleeing suspects past reservation boundaries.
  • under certain circumstances, arrest non-Indians for state crimes committed on the reservation.

The agreement is part of a new Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Suquamish Tribe and Kitsap County, and fulfills the conditions of a Washington State statute that, upon request, requires county governments to enter into agreements with tribes when they share jurisdiction on an Indian reservation (RCW 10.92). The KCSO and SPD have worked together to provide law enforcement services on the Port Madison reservation for many years. However, depending on the type of land ownership and the Indian status of individuals, the rules for jurisdiction changed for each agency.

KCSO Lt. Jeffrey Menge pointed out that prior to the MOU a tribal officer had (and still has) the right to detain any person suspected of a crime and could investigate any crime on the reservation but they could not make any formal arrests or transports under state law. This will now change. An example of this new collaboration can be illustrated with a common DUI Investigation. In the past, a tribal officer had the ability to stop and detain a person suspected of DUI on the reservation but once they determined the suspect was “non-Indian”, the officer was required to stop and wait for a KCSO Deputy or State Trooper to respond and finish the investigation. Under the MOU, the Suquamish officer can now complete the entire investigation under state authority, including arrest and transport to the jail, thus eliminating the need to tie up other officers and duplicate efforts.

The Suquamish Police Department includes a Marine Division, that also coordinates with Kitsap County Sheriff Deputies.

“It doesn’t take two cops to do the work of one cop. Tribal officers and citizens have been stuck on the side of the road awaiting the arrival of a Deputy, who in many cases was pulled away from a more serious investigation to come handle a minor offense. It gets worse; two officers now have to write reports, receive subpoenas and will have to go to court at substantial cost to two different governments. These are low level cases; traffic violations and misdemeanor property crimes. We want our deputies out there catching burglars and heroin dealers, not driving 20 minutes to write a suspended driver a citation we could have issued in 90 seconds,” said Suquamish Police Chief Mike Lasnier.

Sheriff Gary Simpson credits a good working relationship between Kitsap County and the Suquamish Tribe for making the MOU a reality. “Our already collaborative and cooperative working relationship made this process as easy as it could have been, given its complexity.” Simpson said, “In many ways, this agreement memorializes an already fantastic working relationship.”
Sheriff Simpson added that the end result of the complex process is “a more effective and efficient public safety response for all citizens on the Port Madison Reservation and surrounding communities.”

Kitsap County Sherriff will be hosting an open house for those who want to know more at 5:30 p.m. on June 22, 2017 at the Suquamish United Church of Christ, 18732 Division Ave. NE, Suquamish, WA 98392.  For more information on the interlocal agreement, check out our Suquamish Police Frequently Asked Questions Page or download a printable brochure by clicking here.

Schooner Adventuress visits Suquamish – Free Public Dockside Tours April 17

The Adventuress will be moored at the Suquamish Dock April 17-18, 2016.

Adventuress – Puget Sound’s official Environmental Tall Ship – to visit Suquamish on Monday, April 17 during Earth Month. The historic ship is one of only two National Historic Landmark (NHL) sailing ships still in active operation on the West Coast. Special thanks to the Suquamish Tribe for making available the use of the public dock.

Adventuress will be open for FREE Dockside Tours:

Monday, April 17 from 3:00-5:00PM

Visitors can climb aboard the ship and learn about its century-old history with a maiden voyage to the Arctic for the American Museum of Natural History, service for decades with the San Francisco Bar Pilots, and role as an on-the-water education platform for Puget Sound youth since 1963.

Adventuress is owned and operated by the nonprofit Sound Experience with a mission to educate, inspire, and empower an inclusive community that works to improve our marine environment and celebrates our maritime heritage. On occasion, the organization partners with Suquamish youth program staff to develop meaningful programs for young people involving both tribal canoes and Adventuress.

Adventuress sails “not for one but for all” with the core belief that We are ALL shipmates.

For more information, visit www.soundexp.org

Suquamish Foundation’s Time To Gather Raises 50K

A silent auction table at the Time to Gather event, held on Friday, March 24 at Kiana Lodge.

The Suquamish Foundation held its annual “A Time to Gather” fundraising event Friday, March 24, at Kiana Lodge. The sold-out crowd of enthusiastic bidders helped the Foundation reach its $50,000 fundraising goal, the proceeds targeted for a planned playground, the Suquamish Museum, and benefiting programs from the broader community.
Guests were welcomed by Tribal Chairman Leonard Forsman and Foundation Manager, Angela Flemming who presented a brief history of the event, its purpose and importance to the Suquamish Tribe. Happy attendees enjoyed a delicious meal of either cedar-wrapped salmon, apricot chicken or braised eggplant, all prepared by the experienced staff at Kiana Lodge.
Standout live auction items included a traditional medicinal herbs gathering excursion with Noel Purser-Rosario, a Port Madison Indian Reservation tour led by Tribal Chairman, Leonard Forsman, two limited edition serigraphs by Preston Singletary, a 3 day-2 night Alaska Fishing Adventure, and an original brush and ink painting of the Traveling Coyote by Emma Noyes. Bidding was spirited and exceeded the valued price for the benefit of the Suquamish Foundation.

Suquamish Tribe General Council 2017 Election

In addition to being reelected at Suquamish Tribal Chairman, Leonard Forsman was also honored as a new member of the Suquamish Elders- a designation given to Tribal Members when they turn 55 years-old.

The Suquamish Tribe annual General Council meeting was held March 18-19, 2017 at Kiana Lodge. In addition to hearing reports from departments throughout government and business operations, Suquamish Tribal Members also had the opportunity to vote for Chairman and Secretary of the Suquamish Tribal Council. A total of 355 Tribal Members voted in the election.

Two people ran for the Chairmanship, incumbent Leonard Forsman and Wayne George. Forsman won re-election with 68 percent of the vote. There were four candidates nominated for Secretary. Nigel Lawrence was re-elected to the position with 120 votes. Matt Hawk Sr. ran and received 113 votes. Votes and remaining candidates were Randy George (78) and Linda Holt (45).

Forsman has served as Chairman of the Suquamish Tribe since 2005. In addition to his position on council, he is also the Vice-Chairman of the national Advisory Council on Historic Preservation. He is a graduate of the University of Washington and holds a master of arts in historic preservation from Goucher College.

This is the third time Lawrence has been elected to the Suquamish Tribal Council, and his second consecutive term. In addition to his position on council, Lawrence is the Director of the Marion Forsman-Boushie Early Learning Center and a graduate of Eastern Michigan University.

The council consists of four officers; Chairman, Vice-Chairman, Treasurer, Secretary; and three at-large Council members. The Chairman only votes in case of a tie. Tribal Council officers and members serve three-year staggered terms. The Tribal Council meets on alternate Mondays and as needed throughout the year. For more information, visit the Government section of our website.